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Laws, postgraduate (LLM/ PG Diploma/ PG Certificate) at TMUC

When you join the Postgraduate Laws programme as a student of the University of London International Programmes at TMUC, you’ll be joining an international community of high academic achievers whose affiliation with the University truly sets them apart.

Although this programme is offered through the University of London International Programmes, the academic management of the Master of Laws (LLM) is provided jointly by the Departments of Law of Queen Mary (QMUL) and UCL. The teachers from the University of London Law Schools plan the structure and content of the programme, develop and write study materials, set the examination papers and mark scripts. Both QMUL and UCL have 5-star rated Departments of Law.

Fee Structure

Pay as you go: 2016 2017
Registration Fee £886 £900
Fees per module £486 £500
Pay up front: 2016 2017
Total LLM (16 modules) £8,662 £8,900
Total PG Diploma (10 modules) £5,746 £5,900
Total PG Certificate (5 modules) £3,316 £3,400
Individual Module taken on a stand-alone basis 2016 2017
Total Individual module stand alone basis £530 £545
Additional fees payable to the University (where applicable) 2016 2017
Accreditation of prior learning application fee (per module) £85 £89
Examination resit fee (per module) £62 £64
Fee for changing module £158 £166

 

You can tailor the LLM programme to suit your personal and professional life. You will be selecting a specialized course or can choose courses from within the heads of different specializations.

This LLM by distance learning offers one of the widest choices of modules on the global market, including:

    • Commercial and corporate law

    Commercial banking law: bank customer relationship

    Applicable laws and procedures in international commercial arbitration

    Securities law

    Corporate finance and management issues in company law

     

    • Law and Development

    International economic law

    Human Rights of Women (previously the option available was Multinational enterprises and the law but this has been finished by UoL)

    World trade law

    United Nations protection of human rights

     

    • Criminology & Criminal Justice

    Comparative criminal justice policy

    International criminal law

    Law of financial crime

    Jurisprudence & legal theory (previously the option available was Youth Justice but this has been finished by UoL)

Module A: Methods of comparative research

Finding data

Measuring crime

Comparing statistics

Comparing policies

Module B: Legal cultures and criminal justice policy

Common law

Civil law

Socialist law

Islamic law

Module C: Aspects of comparative criminal policy

Policing and prosecution

Trials and sentencing

Use of imprisonment

Probation and community punishment

Module D: Global crime

Controlling transnational crime

War crimes

Terrorism

International law and crime

Sequence:
The modules must be attempted in order.

Textbooks:
Francis Pakes, Comparative Criminal Justice 2nd ed (Cullompton: Willan, 2010),
ISBN: 9781843927693

Tim Newburn and Richard Sparks (eds), Criminal Justice and Political Cultures (Cullompton: Willan, 2004), ISBN: 9781843920540

Alison Liebling and Shadd Maruna (eds), The Effects of Imprisonment (Cullompton: Willan, 2006), ISBN: 9781843922179

Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (London: Penguin, 2006), ISBN: 9780143039884 or 9780140187656

International criminal law

Students are advised that the subject demands some previous knowledge of public international law.

Module A: General context and international crimes before national courts

International law principles of State jurisdiction

Customary international law and treaty law

Direct criminal responsibility under international law

Treaty provisions requiring States to criminalise conduct (including terrorism and torture)

Piracy

Module B: Substantive international crimes

Jurisdiction and structure of international criminal courts and tribunals

Co-operation with international criminal courts and tribunals

Investigations, prosecutions, evidence and procedure before international criminal courts and tribunals

Fair trial rights appeals, revision and enforcement of sentences before international criminal courts and tribunals

Module C: The core international crimes (crimes within the jurisdiction of international tribunals

The elements of international crimes

War crimes

Crimes against humanity

Genocide

Aggression and crimes against peace

Module D: General principles of international criminal law

Aut dedere aut judicare (“extradite or prosecute”) and unlawful abductions

Jurisdictional immunities

Modes of participation in crimes, and concurrence of crimes

Defences

Sequence:
Module A must be attempted before section B; section A must be attempted before section
C; sections A and C must be attempted before section D.

Textbooks:
Antonio Cassese, International Criminal Law 2nd ed (Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2004), ISBN: 9780199259397

Claire De Than and Edwin Shorts, International Criminal Law and Human Rights (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2003), ISBN: 9780421722507

Philippe Sands (ed), From Nuremberg to The Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), ISBN: 9780521536769

Students are not required to have taken an undergraduate course in Jurisprudence, but it will be assumed that they will have some familiarity with standard works in the field up to LLB standard.

The double modules can be attempted in either order.

Double section A/B: Modern legal theory

Selected topics in the development of Anglo-American legal philosophy from the origins of utilitarianism to the present day, including contemporary debates on philosophical method and the nature of law.

Double section C/D: Liberty, equality and law

Selected topics in the development of liberalism, including the ideas of liberty and equality and their relevance in the present day to our understanding of community, economics, cultural diversity and feminism.

Sequence: Either first.

Textbook: Ronald Dworkin, Law’s Empire new edition (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 1998), ISBN: 9781841130415

Law of financial crime

[Please note: this course replaces ‘Fraud, corruption and money laundering’]

Module A: Insider dealing and market abuse

The sources of the law on insider dealing

The EC context of market abuse: insider dealing and market abuse

The purpose of the law on insider dealing, and whether or not insider dealing ought to be
criminalised

Insider dealing offences under Part V of the Criminal Justice Act 1993

The power of regulators

Market abuse regulation

Module B: Fraud and market manipulation

The development of the criminal law of fraud

The economic and historical context of the law on abusive practices

Market manipulation offences

Fraud Act 2006 offences

Theft Act 1968 offences

Module C: Money laundering

The purpose of money laundering regulation

The international dimension

The context of money laundering regulation

Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 offences

Terrorism Act 2000 offences

Money Laundering Regulations 2007

The efficacy of money laundering regulation Civil recovery

Module D: The nature of the law on financial crime

The sources of the law on financial crime

The objectives of the law on financial crime

The economic and historical context of the law on corruption

The role of information and transparency in financial criminal law

The EC Market Abuse Directive

The role of the regulators in prosecuting criminal offences

The role of criminal law in supporting financial regulation in the UK

Other criminal offences under Financial Services and Markets Act 2000

The underlying objectives of the criminal law in relation to finance

Civil recovery

Sequence:
Module A, B and C must be completed before Module D.

Textbooks:
Alastair Hudson Law of Finance. (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 2009) ISBN: 9780421947306

For Sections C and D of the course only:
Peter Alldridge, Money Laundering Law (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2003), ISBN: 9781841132648

Youth justice

 

In order to be eligible to register for the LLM degree, Postgraduate Diploma in Laws or Postgraduate Certificate in Laws, you must satisfy UoL entrance requirements. We accept qualifications from around the world, please see Postgraduate Laws Qualifications for Entrance on http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/llm#requirements.

For general guidance please see below:

Master of Laws (LLM)

Applicants are required to have at least one of the following:

  • A bachelor degree (or an acceptable equivalent) which is considered at least comparable to a UK second class honours degree, from an institution acceptable to the University of London. In addition at least 50% of all units studied must be in Law related subjects*that are acceptable to the University.
  • Bachelor of Laws (LLB) from the University of London with at least second class honours (applicants who obtained the LLB Pass degree before 1969 may make a special application).
  • A Bachelor of Laws (or an acceptable equivalent) which is considered at least comparable to a UK second class honours degree, from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • Masters of Laws (or an acceptable equivalent) from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • Master’s degree (or an acceptable equivalent) from an institution acceptable to the University. In addition at least 50% of all units studied must be in Law related subjects* that are acceptable to the University.
  • Passed the Bar Vocational Course (BVC) of England and Wales or the Qualifying Examination of the Solicitors Regulation Authority of England or the corresponding examinations in Scotland or Northern Ireland, where in either case the student has also obtained a bachelor degree which is considered at least comparable to a UK second class honours degree from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • Obtained either the Common Professional Examination or an acceptable Graduate Diploma in Law where in either case the student has also obtained an undergraduate degree which is considered at least comparable to a UK second class honours degree from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • Qualified as a solicitor or barrister in England or Wales, or the equivalent outside England or Wales.
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Law from the University of London.

 

*Law related subjects means a subject which is considered by the University to have substantial law content. If you require further information then please contact-us.

*It is important to note that if you do not have the relevant requirements for the LLM you can enter at PGCert or PGDip level and progress through the two awards to gain the LLM.

Postgraduate Diploma

Applicants are required to have at least one of the following:

  • A bachelor degree from the University of London with at least second class honours.
  • A bachelor degree (or an acceptable equivalent) which is considered at least comparable to a UK second class honours degree, from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • Masters degree from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Law from the University of London.

Postgraduate Certificate

Applicants are required to have at least one of the following:

  • A bachelor degree from the University of London.
  • A bachelor degree (or an acceptable equivalent) from an institution acceptable to the University.
  • At least five years relevant work experience, such as accounting, banking, finance or insurance.

In certain circumstances, an applicant who does not satisfy the above requirements may be permitted to register for the Postgraduate Certificate in Laws if the University is satisfied that their background, experience and professional qualifications (if any) are sufficient.

Language requirement

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed any of the following within the past three years:

  • (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 6.5 is achieved with a minimum of 6.0 in the Written sub-test
  • Pearson Test of English (Academic) score of 59 or above, with at least 59 in both Reading and Writing elements and at least 54 in Speaking and Listening elements
  • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English
  • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English, provided grade C or above is achieved
  • (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 92 or above with at least 22 in both Reading and Writing Skills sub-tests and at least 20 in both Speaking and Listening sub-tests.

Alternatively an applicant may be considered for admission to the LLM, Postgraduate Diploma in Laws or Postgraduate Certificate in Laws if they submit evidence of:

  • Substantial education (minimum of eighteen months) conducted and assessed in English; or
  • Substantial work experience (minimum of eighteen months) conducted in English. Where an applicant does not meet the required English language level but believes they can demonstrate the required level for admission the University may, at its discretion, consider the application.

Computer requirements

Internet access

All students are required to have regular internet access, allowing them to access the following resources:

  • The Student Portal.
  • University of London email address.
  • Details of their student records.
  • Programme resources on the eCampus (VLE) (as applicable).
  • Programme resources on the University of London International Programmes website.
  • The Programme Specification and Regulations for their programme of study.
  • The University Regulations and the University of London International Programmes Student Charter.

If a student can justifiably demonstrate that they do not have regular access to the internet to access the required resources, then in these circumstances, a student may formally contact the Programme Director to request for alternative special arrangements to be made.

Quick Info

  • Laptop and more tools available during the courses
  • Online course content access
  • SMS and Email notification
  • Affordable course fee
  • Dedicated Course Trainer

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